Quick Review: Honeygrids Para 88 Grid

A few years ago, I decided to purchase a grid for my Broncolor Para 88 to help control spill in smaller spaces and create more dramatic lighting effects. The Broncolor-branded grids for their paras are insanely expensive; about $700 for the 88 (and much more for the larger Para reflectors), and only comes in a 40-degree variant. Needless to say, I had to find another solution.

I've known of Honeygrids for some time. I first heard about them from the FredMiranda forums when someone mentioned the company in a thread eons ago — Honeygrids produces excellent, durable honeycomb grids for many popular modifiers, and can even do custom grids for nearly any modifier you may have. 

I first saw the Honeygrids Para 88 grid in person a few years ago at a Broncolor workshop in LA. The para they had on display during the workshop had an interesting large, framed grid, similar to a regular hard reflector grid, only much, much larger. (you can see it behind the Para 177 and Urs Recher in this photo). As a fan of aesthetics, I was intrigued by the look of the grid, as it looked much like a large honeycomb grid for a beauty dish or small reflector. The attachment method was also interesting, utilizing small clips that attached to the ribs at the front of the para to hold it in place.

Broncolor Para 88 w/ Honeygrids 30-degree grid (black)

Broncolor Para 88 w/ Honeygrids 30-degree grid (black)

The Honeygrids grid is well built with an aluminum frame and polycarbonate grid material that comes in a variety of light spread patterns — by default, they offer 15°, 30°, and 60° grids, although wider or tighter grids may be custom-made. I chose the 30° grid for my use since it is closest to the 40° Broncolor grid, at a cost of $199. The grids are all the same price, regardless of the light spread.

Broncolor Para 88 w/ Honeygrids 30-degree grid (black)

Broncolor Para 88 w/ Honeygrids 30-degree grid (black)

The only difficulty I have with the Honeygrids grid is that since it is built much like a grid for a beauty dish, is that it's clunky to transport — while the grid is durable in its construction, you still want to take care not to damage the grid material when moving it between shoots. While there are no readily-available transport solutions made for this since it's so large, I have received suggestions from some of our readers to either custom build a custom hard transport case with 1/4" MDF, or even better (and less hassle) — a gong bag.

Gridded Para 88 w/ Para 177 for fill (result below)

Gridded Para 88 w/ Para 177 for fill (result below)

VapeMZ_June2018_01.jpg

The grid performs well, and functions as one would expect — We used it above during an editorial shoot for Vape News Magazine — nothing out of the ordinary for these grids, other than that they also offer grids in "white", which offers a smoother transition/falloff — see an example here, on their website. After using the Para 88 grid for the last 5-6 months, I can highly recommend them if you own a Para. The pricing, build quality, and overall customer experience has been great, and I look forward to purchasing more grids for various modifiers from Honeygrids in the future.


Help us out!

If this has helped you in any way, or if you have any questions or comments, leave 'em down below, or shoot us an e-mail! And, as always, if you're thinking about buying some gear (check out our gear page), please consider using our Amazon links throughout this article or down below; it helps us create content that you like to read and/or that helps you out, and it costs you nothing extra — win/win!